Tag Archives: Art in SL

Artistic timbres in second Life

 

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

Saturday, June 20th saw the opening of a new exhibition featuring the art of Second Life photographer and sculptor, Slatan Dryke.

A Palette of Timbres, hosted at Virtual Ability’s Cape Able Art Gallery, presents 27 images captured by Slatan together with a number of his still and animated sculptures. As might be taken from the title of the exhibition, each of the images on display features strong tonal colours which mark them as much as – if not more so – than their subject matter.

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

The result is a series of pictures, many of them of familiar places across Second Life, presented in the most striking of ways, where the choice of colour both projects a sense of texture and tone of mood – much as musical timbre is used to describe the deeper sense of tone and quality evidenced in the sound of music – light, dark, warm, bright, cool, and so on.

Of course, we’re all familiar with seeing colour in art, responding to its use and the way in which the artist makes use of his or her palette; but within several of the pieces here, there is the deliberate over-emphasis of certain colours and shades to present the subject matter in such a way as to almost give it a voice, a sound; perhaps even a harmony. Thus, the observer is offered a glimpse into the world of psychoacoustics which is in many respects, entirely in keeping with the place in which the exhibition is being hosted.

Which is also not to say that one needs to be deeply immersed in the theory of timbre and sound or the use of colour in order to appreciate the pieces on display. Slayton has a fine eye for composition – as fine a composer’s ear for music, one might be tempted to say –  and his images are exquisite in their detail and beauty, which makes them tempting additions for any collection or home.

Should you be interested in owning a copy of any of the pieces displayed, please keep in mind that Virtual Ability is a non-profit 501(c)3 organisation, and is prevented from allowing third parties such as artists from selling directly on their regions; so please contact Slayton directly.

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

Slayton Drake: A Palette of Timbres, Cape Able Art Gallery

While visiting Cape Able, do make sure you visit the resource centre there, and learn more about Virtual Ability’s work with the hearing impaired, including their Deaf Chat Coffee house – see iSke’s comments following this article on the work there. Also be sure to visit the Fenimore Art Museum, which is currently hosting an exhibition of the work of American artist and illustrator, Maxfield Parrish.

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A Toysoldier’s artistry in The Living Room

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

Now open at The Living Room, the music and arts venue operated by Owl Dragonash and Daallee, is an special exhibition of the art and artistry of Toysoldier Thor, which features items of both his 2D and 3D art.

I profiled Toy’s work back in February 2015, and for those who haven’t as yet visited his gallery space in Second Life, the exhibition at The Living Room serves as an excellent introduction to his art, featuring as it does several of his 3D sculptures, some of which are displayed alongside his own 2D interpretations of the pieces, as well as a number of his paintings.

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

Included in the latter is one of my personal favourites, Assassin’s Prayer (shown above), beautifully displayed behind a glass partition. This is quite honestly an utterly captivating piece, which beautifully blends elements taken from both Second Life to produce a finished picture which carries a powerful symbolism and story.

Also on display here is Shattered, another emotive piece (not shown here) which has taken Toy on a remarkable journey, as it has evolved from a painting in the physical world through to a mesh model within Second Life to becoming a 3D printed model, and which is now a beautiful piece of physical art cast in bronze, and which can now be pre-ordered as a part of a second casting run. You can read more about this piece on the upper mezzanine of the exhibition.

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

Toysoldier Thor at The Living Room

For the exhibition, the gallery space at The Living Room has again had a make-over to keep the look and feel of the space in keeping with the artwork on display, and the finished result is highly effective. The exhibition of Toy’s work will continue at The Living Room through until the end of the month.

As usual, there will also be special live events at The Living Room in June, comprising:

  • Thursday, June 16th – live music with:
    • 17:00 – Billy Thunders
    • 18:00 – Anidi Huet
  • Tuesday, June 23rd 19:00 SLT – Toysoldier Thor closing party with BartAlan Barbasz.

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A fractal Metropolis in Second Life

At the end of 2015, the population of the world will reach 7.3 billion human beings, among which more than 50% are in urban areas. In 2050, UNO forecasts, as a central scenario, 9.6 billion people, with 2/3 living in cities, which therefore will have to host 2.5 billion additional inhabitants in the next 35 years. Tokyo gathers more than 35 million people, while New Delhi, Mumbai, Sao Paulo, Shangaï and Osaka account already for more than 20 million.

Thus Gem Preiz describes the theme for his latest exhibition of fractal art, Metropolis, which opens on Saturday, June 6th at the Influence Art Community.

Those familiar with his work know that Gem’s fractal art often suggests huge architectural landscapes and forms: towering fingers of colour and light, sweeping cityscapes frozen in time, a glimpse of places of the future and perhaps of worlds away from our own – as much in time as perhaps in distance.

With Metropolis, as his opening description suggests, Gem presents nineteen of these magnificent vistas to comment on the increasingly teeming nature of our global civilisation as more and more of just enter the world, live longer and bring forth a need of ever bigger and more complex cities, which themselves become ever more indistinguishable one from another as our reliance on technology homogenizes them such that shopping malls, business centres, even our lifestyles, become as standardised as everything else we reply upon.

The pieces are arranged in such a way as to suggest the visitor is within the huge metropolis of the exhibition’s title. Spread across multiple levels, linked by catwalks and teleport elevators, the images are suggestive of huge, glass-fronted towers and views across a gigantic cityscape.

To give a senses of scale to this “city”, and to link back to the theme of our ever-expanding and increasingly technology and business-driven civilisation, the squares and levels through the exhibition space are filled with the black silhouettes of people all apparently moving hither and thither, carrying briefcases, pulling travel cases, hurrying to this or that appointment, talking on their cellular ‘phones, haling one another and … occasionally, trying to catch-up with news the old-fashioned way: leafing through a newspaper, or holding a hand to their chin as if pondering – or lost.

So it is that Metropolis works on two levels. Taken as a whole, it admirably stands as an installation that reflects the central themes of Gem’s introductory notes; it demands one cams back in order to take in all of the scenes presents as broadly as possible, to witness this as a a city awash in activity. At the same time the images demand our studied attention, because they are all individually quite simply breathtaking in scope and form; there is a wealth of detail and complexity within each that is truly magnificent. So real do they feel, that it is hard not to wish you could step into them and walk along the halls and corridors that seem to lie behind their tiered, windowed facades, or wander the avenues and paths that sit between their ornate structures.

This is another masterful display of fractal art by Gem which will remain available for at least the rest of the month. Not only has he provided the art and the theme for the exhibit, Gem has also provided a suitable musical track on his You Tube channel which can be listened to while exploring the installation. Recommended.

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Artistic collaboration in Second Life

Collaboration, June 2015

Collaboration, June 2015

One of the strengths of Second Life that’s often pointed to is the collaborative power that lies within the platform. Thanks to the broad range of tools and capabilities offered, collaborative efforts can take many different forms, from content creation through to teaching or music, cinematography, research, and so on.

Where art is concerned, the platform can be a very effective means of collaboration, and I’ve covered a number of examples through the arts reviews in this blog (menu: EVENTS-REVIEWS-TRAVEL > REVIEWS > SL ART AND LEA). However, Kylie Sabra drew my attention to a particularly interesting collaboration between herself and Nils Urqhart, which is currently the subject of a modest exhibition now open at the gallery space at W.E.at Home.

Collaboration, June 2015

Collaboration, June 2015

“It started as a whim,” Kylie says of the exhibition. “Upon a visit to Nils’ photo gallery, I was taken once more by the beauty of his work. I’ve always been a fan of macro lens photography and began to see the possibility the work afforded as an art medium; a beginning point for a new view.

“Nils and I worked together choosing just the right pieces and then I headed in to the Photo Shop and went to work. It was freeing and I had a wonderful time with the project. ”

The result is an intriguing series of paired images, an original macro lens photograph by Nils, who has a passion for colour and lighting, as evidenced in the pictures on display, together with a digital art piece by Kylie which takes all or a part of Nils’ original and offers a different interpretation / perspective on it.

Collaboration, June 2015

Collaboration, June 2015

Taken together, the paired pieces offer a fascinating view of how a subject can be uniquely interpreted and presented, while at the same time, each individual piece by Nils or Kylie, works entirely on its own, offering an eye-catching work that lends considerable grace to any in-world wall and home, with all of the pieces are offered for sale individually.

As noted, this is a modest exhibition, offering just 6 pairs of images. Nevertheless, it stands as an ideal introduction to what I hope will be a continuing collaboration between Kylie and Nils.

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