Tag Archives: Art in SL

Art in ice

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

Running through until January 2015 at the Paris Metro Art Gallery is an exhibition of SL landscapes by Olympes Rhodes, featuring a collection of pictures captured from around Second Life which reflect the theme of winter in one way or another.

Some twenty-one pictures are on display, arranged on two levels within the gallery space, which has been transformed into something of an ice palace for the exhibition; the floor and walls covered in panelling covered in a ice-like effect and which are semi-transparent, so the world outside can just bee seen through the gallery’s actual windows, while the mezzanine floor of the upper level and the grand staircase leading up to it have a ghostly, translucent finish to them suggestive of them having been cut from ice.

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

“My job was to create an environment in the gallery that supports the works,” curator Quan Lavender says of the interior design, “And fits to the wonderful Winter scene with ice pond in front of the building.” I’d say she’s succeeded, the interior fittings rounded-off with a series of ice carvings and other accessories Quan found at the Xmas Expo, and which fit the theme perfectly.

Not all of the pictures on display may appear to be winter scenes; they don’t all have snow and frost featured within them, for example. But the theme is there to be found in each and every one, even if the presentation is subtle – such as with the pictures taken at Chouchou, which suggest feelings of winter and ice through the backdrop of the Memento Mori cathedral. In another, a little group of penguins standing on the beach provide the necessary connection.

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

Olympes Rhodes, Paris Metro Art Gallery

All of the pieces have their own beauty and delicacy about them, and each one offers a unique interpretation of some very famous regions in Second Life. Their names are not given, which encourages the visitor to spend time examining each picture in greater detail to see if the location can be identified. Or at least, that was the case with this visitor!

When visiting, and if you are so minded, don’t forget that gallery owner Rose (rfb Morpork) has created a gown to match the theme of the exhibition, which can be obtained from the gift giver outside the gallery.

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Perceptions of depth and narratives in art

Depth Perception

Depth Perception – The Rose Art Gallery

This article was updated on Sunday, December 8th to reflect the fact the Château d’Ember display has been taken down, having been a special opening event.

Depth Perception is a new exhibition of the work of artist Molly Bloom, which was initially previewed at the Château d’Ember, on the Adult-rated, Gorean-themed region of Asperiche Island on Saturday, December 6th, 2014, with the main exhibition opening at midday SLT on Sunday, December 7th at the Rose Art Gallery, Angel Manor.

As the title suggests, Depth Perception offers the observer with a series of images which play with our perception of depth, and does so in a most eye-catching manner.

Depth Perception

Depth Perception  -“Throwing in the Cards” and “The Electrical Bouquet”, as displayed at Chateau d’Ember

All of the pieces on display, be they individual images, pairs of images or triptych pieces, have elements of the work extending beyond the picture frame, either as a part of the picture itself (such as the shadow of a boot which itself appears to be resting on the frame containing it), or as a 3D element in its own right (such as an extended hand holding a copy of the Bible). Some even include 3D elements that sit entirely outside of the picture itself, but which are nevertheless part of it. These can be as obvious as a television set placed before a picture, and which is clearly the subject of attention of those within the picture, or as subtle as a bird sitting on a picture frame.

Depth Perception - The rose Art Gallery

Depth Perception – The Rose Art Gallery

However it is presented, each image is beautifully composed, and many, particularly those in pairs or in a triptych, have a narrative to them; sometimes obvious, sometimes a little more subtle (and there are stories to be found in the individual pieces as well).

The installation at the Rose offers forms the main exhibition, and presents the works on display highly effectively; the installation is really eye-catching, the grey / black of the gallery space helping to draw the eye deeply into each picture in turn.

Depth Perception - Chateau d'Ember

Depth Perception – “The Queen is NOT Amused”, as displayed at Chateau d’Ember

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Water, through a photographer’s eyes

H2O - Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

H2O – Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

Sometime in the early years of our planet, billions of years ago, two gases allied themselves – hydrogen and oxygen. They became a liquidity, which enabled the emergence of life on earth. Water – the basic element – the element of constant change. It all began with water and water is inside anything living. Water – the element of constant change.

Thus reads the introduction to H2O, a photographic exhibition by Walt Ireton – known in the physical world as Jay Evers – at his Sominiem Art Gallery in Tabula Rasa. Based in Hamburg, Germany and Enschede in The Netherlands, Walt’s business is creative wedding documentary and event photography. However, his passion lies within the fields of natural, street, and macro photography.

H2O - Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

H2O – Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

These three aspects of his photography are combined H2O, which, as the introduction and title suggest, focuses on the subject of water. On display are some 37 images taken from the physical world (four of them stunning photo montages of a single image divided into three or four parts), split across two levels of the gallery space which Walt also designed.  And believe me when I say, they are simply stunning.

“Water is very good in showing us how restricted our visual perception actually is,” Walt says of the exhibition. “Our eyes can see only a small part of the existing light [and] all information that our eyes do see, is filtered in various ways before it reaches the conscious part of our brain.

“Another aspect of water is, that it is moving most all of the time,” he adds. “A camera is capable of de-accelerated perception, which with longer exposure times makes moving water look like diffused veils or misty clouds. A vision of the primeval ocean suggests itself.”

H2O - Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

H2O – Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

All of which leads him to conclude that while a photograph does not really show an absolute and objective moment in time, it can nevertheless, and almost literally in the case of the natural flow and motion of water, freeze a moments in time which then themselves become timeless, literally.

And “timeless” is precisely the adjective to apply to many of the images here, from the foamed water roiling around rocks so suggestive of that primeval ocean Walt notes through to the amazing sight of the very top of a fountain plume caught in that 1/6000th of a second as it arches and twists at the start of its gravity-induced fall back towards the ground, with so many more in between – such as the reflection of a building caught in a street-side puddle, something unlikely ever to be captured in the same way ever again.

H2O - Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

H2O – Walt Ireton (Jay Evers)

As well as the H2O exhibit, the upper levels of the gallery space (reached via the Anywhere Door on the ground level) also play host to two further exhibitions. The first is Impresiones de La Gomera, presents real life images of the island of La Gomera capture by Walt and his parter, Seoreh Voight, The second is Working Under Pressure, presents the comic book artistry of Martin Scarborough as large-format pieces.

As a final note, not only are the images displayed in H2O and Impresiones for sale at the gallery, those living it Europe can avail themselves of Walt’s website if they so wish and order copies to grace the walls of their physical world home. And when visiting Tabula Rasa, why not avail yourself of the other galleries and exhibitions in the region – including Walt’s own City Windows?

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Of water and geometry

Second Life photographer, blogger and friend, Ziki Questi, has two new exhibitions of her work under way in Second Life right now.

The first, located at the Rose Theatre Art Gallery, Angel Manor, features landscape images with a decidedly watery theme. In fact, of all the original pieces selected for the display, only one didn’t have a watery theme, and so that was swapped out for another at did!

Featured here are some of Ziki’s more recent works from places such as Binemist, NorderNey, The Colder Water, Square Pegs in Round Holes, Sarawak, and more, all in Ziki’s familiar panoramic format, tastefully displayed in one of the gallery’s larger exhibition spaces, with plenty of light and which also offers comfortable sofas from which to admire Ziki’s work.

Ziki Questi: Geometries of the Grid - Holtwaye Art Space

Ziki Questi: Geometries of the Grid – Holtwaye Art Space

“When Holter first contacted me,” Ziki says of the second exhibition of her work,  which is located at the Holtwaye Art Space, curated by Holter Rez, who co-runs the gallery with WayneNZ, “he clearly had some thoughts in mind about what sort of theme he wanted, and I was very surprised to see what he had assembled.”

She continues, “most people probably know me as a photographer of landscapes and artwork, and I often think of my own work that way. But Holter assembled a group of ‘organic’ and ‘inorganic’ images, as he put it, that are more abstract, or at least less immediately recognizable by subject matter.”

Ziki Questi: Geometries of the Grid - Holtwaye Art Space

Ziki Questi: Geometries of the Grid – Holtwaye Art Space

The result is Geometries of the Grid, a selection of images by Ziki spanning a number of years, and taken (predominantly) at art installations which have appeared in Second Life. Each piece – as the title of the exhibition suggests – has been selected for it geometric content and appeal. Spread across two floors of the gallery, the display offers a unique way in which to revisit and recall some unique installations that have appeared in SL.

Both exhibits offer a very individual view of Second Life as captured through the eyes of a very talented photographer, as such, both come highly recommended.

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